The following books are available for purchase through The New World African Press:



 


Red Dust on the Green Leaves

By John Gay

Red Dust on the Green Leaves is the dramatic story of twins Koli and Sumo born in a rural Liberian village soon to be impacted by the modern world. One remains in the village while the other attends mission school.

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The Brightening Shadow

By John Gay

The Brightening Shadow continues the story of twins Koli and Sumo begun in Red Dust on the Green Leaves. Sumo establishes himself as a leader in traditional society, while Koli suffers crushing disappointments in a harsh modern world.

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The Village Boy

By Sakui Malapka

Malapka’s novel, The Village Boy, is a political and social satire that explores some very serious themes in a fictional way. Written in a reverse narrative style, the novel tells the story of Flomo Tuotaa Gadei, a sort of boy genius from the twin communities of Zie Woba and Zie Mazu. The Village Boy is a work of fiction. However, the strength of the work lie in the realism that comes through the words, sentences, paragraphs and chapters you are about to read. This novel is compelling, and is a must for those interested in fine literature. C. William Allen, Virginia State University, Petersburg

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Bach: A Fictional Memoir

By Paul Guggenheim
Includes CD of selected works of Bach with commentaries by Dr. Paul Guggenheim.

This memoir of Bach’s is hardly a complete account of his life, much less his works…not surprising, since music and not words were his natural medium of expression…though his memories, as far as they go, are reasonably accurate and reveal insights into his thought processes. The work [memoir] shows that Bach’s principal concern in writing was to record the series disheartening difficulties, which plagued him in his efforts over a lifetime to conduct a proper Musical Divine Service for the Greater Glory of God. Paul Macklis, Librarian at University of California Santa Cruz

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Growth of the Liberian State: An Analysis of Its Historiography

By Clarence E. Zamba Liberty

The Growth of the Liberian State should have a wide appeal – to scholars worldwide united in the disinterested pursuit of truth; to all who believe African scholars have an important contribution to make in relating and interpreting the African experience; to African, African-Americans, and those interested in them; and to Liberians who must develop the understanding and appreciation of themselves and their nation needed to rebuild their nation and forge ahead in the international area. This book is compelling reading. Mary Antoinette Brown Sherman, Former President of the University of Liberia

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Neither Black nor White: The Saga of an American Family

By Joseph E. Holloway

Historical novel, which traces the history of the Hadnot family from Gloucester, England in 1585 to New Orleans and the birth of Lucille Catherine (Celia) Hughes Hadnot the matriarch of six families that traced their descent from her. It is the true story of a black family, who were never enslaved, but owners of slaves. A tale about a people from indentured servitude, slavery, the Colfax riots, segregation and Jim Crow to Civil Rights. It is the story of a people who did not regard themselves as “neither black nor white.” It is a story of a family –one black and the other white. Both related sharing a common ancestor by the named John Hadnot. This novel by Joseph Holloway is compelling reading that explores black culture, history, Jim Crow and issues of colorism.

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An Introduction to Classical African Civilizations

By Joseph E. Holloway

This text offers in a single volume an introduction to classical African history, primary in the period before 1800, with a focus on the great ancient African civilizations. The author draws upon the most recently available information on the history of Africa, including theories of the earliest evolution of humankind. The text then explores the beginnings of African farming when the Sahara was still an open savannah with green pastures and flowing rivers and moves the reader through the ancient kingdoms of Nubia, Meroe, Axum, the medieval Sudanic empires of Ghana, Mali, and Songhai, and on to the development and spread of Islam throughout southern Africa, east Africa, the Kongo and the forest states. It concludes with an exploration of the transatlantic slave trade.

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Africa: A Dream Deferred
By John Gay


This text can be used as a text or as supplementary reading for an introductory course in Africa south of the Sahara, or for anyone interested in contemporary African affairs. Topics covered in the book include the changed moral order, indigenous knowledge, elite domination, education and schooling, demography, religion, medicine, western exploitation, political systems, centralized command economies, and military conflict. In each section historical references support the analysis of the current situation. The book concludes with suggestion for ways in which Africans themselves can take control of their lives and their futures.

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The Native Boy
By William K. Reeves


Herewith is an invitation to you to acquire your own personal copy of “The Native Boy”. William Reeves' autobiography provides one among many Liberian voices that have been missing from African literary production in the post Colonial era. Is The Native Boy a postcolonial text? Reeves documents a life in which his earliest identification was as a Grebo village child and his subsequent 70-some years of experience lead him to call himself a Liberian, still a Grebo, and most definitely an educator. Now, when most news reports of Liberia include the soundbite that the nation was founded by freed slaves from the United States in the 1840s, William Reeves offers a point of view by someone whose ancestors preceded those freed American slaves in the geographical and cultural space that is Liberia. His story is an important challenge to international views of Liberia, to postcolonial theories, to the literary history of Africa.

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LONG DAY’S ANGER
by John Gay

Long Day’s Anger explores the Liberian Civil War through the eyes and the lives of the twins Koli and Sumo whose childhood and young adulthood are told in John Gay’s first two novels, Red Dust on the Green Leaves and The Brightening Shadow. This third novel sheds much light and understanding on the Liberian Civil War that has featured so prominently in African news. Long Day’s Anger is darker than the earlier novels because it shows how the family struggled through the horrors of the first phase of Liberia’s civil war, leading to exile in Ivory Coast. The family survives through the joint efforts and skills of both brothers – traditional and modern – as they escape the war. The novels are a must for all who wish to learn more about an African country founded by Black Americans in 1847, and suffering since then under a mixed cultural hegemony.

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“SPACE: A JOURNALIST’S NOTEBOOK,”
is designed to appeal to a general and enlightened audience, to trekkies, space freaks, anyone with an inquisitive mind

Dr. DeWayne B. (Doc) Johnson, author of "FLYING SAUCERS: Are We There Yet?" is a retired professor of journalism at California State University, Northridge, and a retired desk editor of the Los Angeles Times. He is an award-winning journalist and a distinguished emeritus professor of journalism.

The first book, “Space for Speculation, “ deals with our expanded knowledge of the limitless universe, mankind’s increasing attempts to understand the nature of infinity, endless time, the beauties and pitfalls that await explorers in space. It is light-hearted in approach yet deadly serious in intent. The second book, “Flying Saucers: Fact or Fiction” has become something of a collector’s item. The publication is in fact two books sandwiched between two covers. Two books for the price of one!

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“JELLEMOH,”
“Mary Antoinette Brown Sherman has left us a gem. In JELLEMOH a highly literate account of the life of a distinguished woman who in symbolizing Liberia (and Africa) fused in her experience native Africa and westernized Africa. This is a deeply personal account of the life and time of her mother presented with such contextual richness that a social history of Liberia during time frame is the product.

Rare is the genre of the biography on Liberia. Rarer still is its capture not of the widely publicized two separate Liberias, but the struggle towards a cultural hybrid. The study suggests powerfully what the real Liberian society would look like if somehow a critical mass of other such accounts could be produced—the human encounters and accommodations of cultures.”

D. Elwood Dunn
Sewanee – The University of the South

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The African American Experience
By Joseph E. Holloway

The purpose of this History of Black Americans is to overcome the complexity of currents text, to provide a simple basic introduction to the history of African Americans without using complex language and ideas to tell their story. The aim of this text is to be able to reach and speak to the non-specialist general reader, and to write a history of African Americans without the heavy academic language. The first chapter starts with Africa, the middle passage, slave insurrection, the origins of Black Culture, Blacks and the American War of Independence, the Black family during slavery, Blacks and the Civil War, Black Nationalisms and the Back-to-Africa Movement, B. T Washington vs. W.E.B. Dubois, the Harlem Renaissance, Blacks and the Great Depression, the New Deal, the Freedom Movement and Modern Black America, including the Clinton and Bush Administrations.

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Not Black, Not White: The Politics of Apartheid in South Africa
By Steve Farrah

Steve Farrah shows what it is to be neither nor in the bad old days of South Africa’s apartheid regime. This memoir speaks for so-called Colored, who sought to carve out their identity while the struggle raged between the majority of Black Africans and the minority with European ancestry. When I taught African history in Lesotho and South Africa, Colored students stood up boldly and asked Who am I? Who are we? Farrah give them voice. Anyone who wishes to understand today’s complex South African nation and society should read this book.

 

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The Borders In All Of Us
New Approaches to Global Diaspora Societies is a collection of scholarly essay funded by the Ford Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities to develop the integration of areas studies and ethnic studies knowledge into a new curriculum model for multi-cultural studies. This volume is unique in its approach to historical Diasporas in that it explores some of the cross currents within Diasporic communities in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the United States providing new insight into America’s new ethnic majorities. In eighteen chapters the authors examined the historical/political dynamics, and the language/literary traditions and the arts and creative expressions of several ethnic and global Diasporic communities. This anthology serves as a textbook for the Introduction to Comparative Ethnic and Global Societies that would be useful as a text in African Studies, African American Studies, Asian Studies; Chicano/a Studies and Women Studies respectively.

 

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An Obituary for Hawa Barchue
By William Allen

An Obituary for Hawa Barchue, C. William Allen. Allen takes his readers on a roller coaster ride through life in his motherland, Liberia, during the years immediately before that country was plunged into a brutal and devastating 14-year Civil War. Thought the eyes and voice of his main character, Hawa, a young, gregarious single female, the author masterfully uses the reverse narrative style to explore the intricacies and challenges of urban life in a nation struggling with its own social, cultural and political identity. First published in 1983, this remake of Allen’s first novel is a must-read for all who want to taste a slice of life in pre-civil war Liberia. Like his second novel, The African Interior Mission (1992, 2006) this book is offered to help fill the dearth that characterizes the state of creative fiction in Liberia.

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The Noble Drew Ali and the Moorish Science Temple Movemen
 


The Noble Drew Ali and the Moorish Science Temple Movement
Despite the immense influences that the Noble Drew Ali had on Black Nationalism and the black nationalistic movement in North America, we know little about him because the details of his life are sketchy and incomplete at best. As a result of this lack of information, the Noble Drew Ali remains one of the most mystifying figures in all of African American history. This monograph provides information not readily available to the general public, and explores most of the available documents on this mysterious person. The Noble Drew Ali was important because he redefined blackness based on identification with the Moors. His ideas and philosophy have contributed to and made possible the rise of black Messianic figures such as Father Divine, Sweet daddy Grace and many others.

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Paul Von Blum, A Life At the Margins: Keeping the Political Vision
 


Paul Von Blum, A Life At the Margins: Keeping the Political Vision
Paul Von Blum’s A Life at the Margins offers a compelling narrative about a man whose life has been committed to teaching and social justice.  From his reflections about the impact of the Holocaust on his family, to his motivations for a lifetime commitment to the black freedom movement and to his longstanding struggles for fair treatment as a lecturer within the halls of academia, Von Blum poignantly reveals the intricate connections between personal biography and larger social forces.  This book is an uplifting read packed with important insights.

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The Day of Reckoning
 


The Day of Reckoning: No More Mr Taylor

By John Gay

The Day of Reckoning: No More Mr Taylor is John Gay’s fourth novel, completing the family saga told in the novels Red Dust on the Green Leaves, The Brightening Shadow and Long Day’s Anger. This final novel brings the family back from civil war-imposed exile in Ivory Coast. They remake their lives as the bloody conflict concludes, leading to Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf becoming the first woman President of an African nation. The four novels together give a much-needed synthesis and summary of social and economic change in a rural African society.

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Black Slave Masters Revisited
 


Black Slave Masters Revisited
By Joseph Holloway

This book focuses on a select group of Black slaveowners and free Black communities in Virginia, South Carolina and Louisiana. It examines briefly the free African Americans between 1790 and the start of the Civil War. By 1820, 233,504 free African Americans were spread throughout the country. By 1860, there were 488,070 free Blacks, with 47.3 percent of the free Blacks living in cities with populations of more than 100,000. 62.5 percent of free Blacks lived in the cities rather than in rural areas.

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Homegoings
 


Homegoings, Crossings, and Passings: Life and Death in the African Diaspora
Regennia Williams, Editor

The essays in Homegoings, Crossings, and Passings: Life and Death in the African Diaspora explore beliefs about—or issues related to—life, quality of life, death, and the afterlife among Africans and those comprising various parts of the African Diaspora, including the United States. These themes are examined from the perspectives of theologians, journalists, and either social, cultural, or art historians. Not only do they recognize the African roots of certain traditions and practices, but they also consider the importance of activities developed during the American leg of the odyssey. Their studies are important additions to a growing body of scholarship on this topic of life, death and dying in the Diaspora.

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Africa: A Dream Denied
 


Africa: A Dream Denied
John Gay

John Gay changed the title of his book from 2003's optimistic Africa: A Dream Deferred to 2013's more realistic Africa: A Dream Denied. How has the dream been denied and by whom? Mainly responsible were three players: African rulers, foreign exploiters of Africa, and development workers who have tried but failed to bring meaningful change to the continent. The author shows how these forces have blocked fulfillment of what could be a true African Renaissance. This edition includes much that is still true from the earlier book, but also emphasizes the unexpected stubborn and continuing stagnation of sub-Saharan Africa to the end of the year 2013.

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Takuku and the Deer
 


Takuku and the Deer
Beatrice Akosua Pokuaah Holloway

Takuku and the Deer is an African tale that tells a story about a poor individual whose life was transformed by a forest deer. This individual was to remain rich as long as he keeps a secret. What was the secret that was supposed to be kept, and what happened afterward? To find out, read this interesting and exciting story.

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A History of Slave Resistance in the United States by Joseph E. Holloway
 


A History of Slave Resistance in the United States
Joseph E. Holloway

The purpose of this new book by Joseph E. Holloway is to provide a comprehensive examination of slave resistances, including enslaved African resistance on board slave ships, and in the United States. This new book makes an important and valuable educational contribution to our understanding of how slave actions contributed to changes in the laws governing African Americans. This book makes available new information for teachers, scholars and the general public on the role that enslaved Africans played in the making of America through their struggles and sacrifices for freedom. Enslaved Africans resisted throughout the transatlantic slave trade; they resisted slavery from its inception in the New World, particularly the United States in the early 1600s to the end of the middle 1800s.

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Creative Souls: African American Artists in Greater Los Angeles by Paul Von Blum
 


Creative Souls: African American Artists in Greater Los Angeles
Paul Von Blum

Paul Von Blum's Creative Souls: African American Artists in Greater Los Angeles extends the opportunity for scholarship on African American art in greater Los Angeles. This volume focuses on 21 contemporary Los Angeles-area visual artists who have made the region a premier center for African American art. Following the format of my earlier volume, each artist has an entire chapter devoted to his or her life and work. The chapters consist of approximately 3000-4000 words and have 6 representative artistic illustrations covering the major themes and styles of each artist's career. Each chapter combines biographical content and artist analysis, focusing on the larger tradition of African American visual art from the early 20th century to the present.

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Black Africa’s Largest Islamic Kingdom Before Colonialism: Royal Ribats Of Kano And Sokoto by John Philips
 


Black Africa’s Largest Islamic Kingdom Before Colonialism: Royal Ribats Of Kano And Sokoto
John Philips

The Nineteenth Century A.D. constituted an epoch in the history of bilad al-Sudan. It ushered in remarkable political, administrative, economic and cultural transformations in the region. These developments were triggered by the activities of a learned scholar, Shaykh Usman Dan Folio. He along with the aid of his able lieutenants: his brother, Abdullah Dan Folio, and his son, Muhammad Bello, succeeded in establishing the largest polity in Tropical Africa in the period.

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